The hungry organ

Two Juglans regia walnuts.

Two Juglans regia walnuts. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Give the body junk food and the brain is certainly going to suffer,” comments nutritionist Bethany Thayer, spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

It is statements like that that renews my horror every time I remember sacks of junk food at the ex-hubster’s house, made available for my then 4-year old.

Experts ask parents, “‘Want your child to do better in school? Take a close look at his or her diet. Certain “brain foods” may help boost a child’s brain growth — plus improve brain function, memory, and concentration.'”

The brain is called a very hungry organ.  Thayer explains that “it is the first among the body’s organs to absorb nutrients from the food we eat.”

WebMD presents these top ten brain foods that will help kids get the most from school. Their experts also provide preparing and serving suggestions:

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The humorous stimuli

Have you got a funny kid or have one among your friends or acquaintances?

If a child has sense of humor early on, it may mean he’s got the genes. Study shows the same parts of the brain that respond to humor in adults are as active in children as early as six years old. And these parts of the brain develop; become more sophisticated with age.

Researchers say this “finding should lead to a better understanding of how positive emotions like a sense of humor develop and affect a child’s well-being.”

Let us touch a little on the significance of humor, the good kind of humor. Better clarify that as there’s a dark sense of humor, a rotten sense of humor, a sick sense of humor, etcetera.  Researchers featured on WebMD specified “balanced and consistent sense of humor may help children negotiate the difficult period of pre-adolescence and adolescence.”

Don’t we all remember the confusion, difficulty as well as the excitement of adolescence? Do you remember how humor helped in whatever way?

A study published in the Journal of Neuroscience show how researchers analyzed brain scans of 15 children aged 6 to 12 years while they watched short video clips. These videos were classified funny (funny and rewarding to watch), positive (rewarding but not funny), and neutral (neither rewarding nor funny).

The results showed that the funny videos activated two regions of the brain, i.e., a lot of activity; that are also activated in the adult brain in response to humor.

English: Dolphy, Filipino actor

English: Dolphy, Filipino actor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Talking of laughter, the passing away of the King of Comedy, Dolphy holds the top spot on Philippine broadcast media this week, doesn’t it? How did he keep people laughing for sixty years? I wonder if he already showed signs of such talent when he was a kid.

Among the speeches at the tribute services, I find myself laughing through my tears at Nova Villa’s account of her funny moments with Dolphy, eg. (“ay hindi pala si Tita Cory… huminto ako sa ka-iiyak dahil sa hiya…” “yon bang wine… pagdating sa bahay binuksan ni Tito Dolphy ang regalo ko, ayun patis!”) I mistook Aunt Cory for someone… so embarrassed that I stopped crying…. That wine we were all keen at that time… when he got home Uncle Dolphy opened my gift, the bottle I gave him and voila! Fish sauce!

May I leave you, friends with this quote: He who laughs, lasts.

Although it doesn’t biologically apply to the dearly departed Dolphy right now 🙂

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Yelling: the cause, the casualty, & the cure

We are humans, we are normal. We do things, human things, and one of them is something anyone may have done or experienced – yelling or being yelled at.

Yelling: the cause, the casualty & the cure is a book packed with practical tips you need to know about the behavior. Author Lorrie Flem gently shows readers, mothers particularly, how negative a behavior yelling can be and how to learn to avoid and overcome it altogether. There are bits of real-life yelling episodes of individuals shown in the book. Some of them you may know to be true or reflective of someone you know.

You’ll be surprised. Surprised that you may think you know how to handle yelling when you get around to it because you think it is not serious and sorting it out is a piece of cake. Or you may be surprised to realize that yelling needs to be cracked at now, not tomorrow or when you are ready to deal with it.

This book is a good eye-opener and guide to help you overcome the problem of yelling. To be frank, my mother had her fair share of yelling when she was raising me. While I think I have this behavior under control when I deal with my son, I do find several instances when I seem to think it is something normal enough I do not even recognize the urgency of avoiding or working to get rid of it. Reading this book made me realize that.

There is going to be a Kindle version of this book on Amazon. Here is the link: http://tinyurl.com/cxbwsdy. What’s great and exciting is, on July 24th the Kindle book will be FREE along with a bunch of other freebies. Check out the delightful Eternal Encouragement site for more information and details.  

And here’s more: there is a Facebook Party for this book on July 24th and you are invited. Go to this link to see the times. It will be fun.

Happy reading!

I received a copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

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Mild phone addiction

In a bid to make CJ follow his morning routine before going to school, i.e., eat, brush teeth and shower on time, I offered him a deal he could not say no to: his own mobile phone. He is mainly after the games so I bought him this China-made, disposable Nokia something.

And a mild addiction began surfacing. More worthwhile activities are put on hold. Yaya could hardly coax him to eat. Wasn’t I told in previous talks with the Grandma that CJ was so keen on this sort of gadget? So I learned yet again.

The fun is on sending each other messages when we are actually just a room apart, no matter how terse replies to my full sentences are. Some indulgence during a two-week vacation when distance between us shrank could not be very bad. Gradual phone use restriction should be in order now that I’m back to reality, a.k.a. work.

What’s for dinner, Mom?

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? I used to ask my own mother that question, and now it’s my turn to answer it. The thing is, I do not always have a ready answer, and most of the time I cast a sheepish glance at the dining table often helplessly and mutter something like, ‘let’s see…’ or ‘pass me my phone please, we’re ordering food’ or worse, ‘get dressed; we’re going out for dinner.’

What’s for Dinner, Mom? has definitely better answers. This printed book presents bulk cooking: the secret to a successful kitchen career. Author Lorrie Flem shows you examples to follow, explains methods you can adapt and plans you can execute to help you produce nutritious meals for your family at regular intervals without losing your sanity or feeling tethered to a rope due to time constraints.

Biblical references and quotes on food injected into the contents of this book triggered nostalgia for home.  The Homemaking Tips from the 1800s appealed to the history lover in me. You will love finding how to involve your children as you work your way around cooking and dining.  The multi-tasking tips are apt for busy moms. I chuckled when I got to this part of the book thinking how at my international business communication job I could multi-task in three languages, but do not know how to multi-task at home. This book has given me ideas how to domesticate such skill.

Now the recipes. They’re the yummy stuff in the book and you’ve been waiting to hear from that, haven’t you? I guarantee they are easy with ingredients you do not have to look further for than your nearest grocery. I am excited to try the ‘stretchers.’ You will know what I’m talking about and more by getting this spiral-bound book in your hands.

The good news is you have a chance to win a copy of this book by leaving your email with your comment below. One winner will be drawn on June 23rd. To find out more about this book, go to the Eternal Encouragement site and see other products available there as well.

I received a copy of this book for an honest review.

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Benefiting from English

Monday, June 11th was CJ’s first day in first grade and the next day I was still on the phone, hungry for updates. My foremost concern was how did he find and take it. Any friends? The first day, I was told, they did mostly orientation stuff. What I liked hearing best of all was that CJ found a friend and behaved just fine.

“Oh, that’s good,” I said to the Grandma. “Who is that kid?” Like any mom I am interested to know who are my child’s friends. CJ’s new school friend, I found, is a transferee student from Cebu. “Looks like a smart kid,” Grandma observed, “he and CJ hit it off quickly as they have one thing in common – they both speak English.”

Apparently, CJ’s English language training has benefited him. And I have yet to ‘unboggle’ my mind about all this talk of local dialects in Philippine schools being adapted as medium of instruction, translations to English, and back to conversational lingo. Sometimes it seems to me Moms have more schoolwork to do than kids.

Mommy Moments & Color Connection

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Chubby doctors

E.D. Leavitt, Physician, Butte, Mt

E.D. Leavitt, Physician, Butte, Mt (Photo credit: Butte-Silver Bow Public Library)

Is your doctor fat, thin or just right?  HealthDay Reporter Randy Dotinga didn’t actually say fat or thin in his Medicine Net report. He called them ‘chubby’ doctors, and that they could be bad for your health.

How? Yes, I asked the same question. Possible reasons derived from a new study are:

  • a doctor with extra pounds to his weight may be unlikely to advise patients to shed excess weight
  • overweight doctors who responded to a survey say that they are less likely to talk to their patients about weight control
  • even doctors of normal weight aren’t prone to talking about  weight loss to their heavy patients

It doesn’t seem far from the pot calling the kettle black. Study author Sara Bleich of the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health says “you can’t look at overweight doctors and say, ‘You’re the problem.'” Research did find that –

doctors of normal weight were more confident than their overweight counterparts about their ability to counsel obese patients about diet and exercise.

A patient having his blood pressure taken by a...

A patient having his blood pressure taken by a physician. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bleich did this study on doctors’ tendency (or the lack of it) to counsel their hefty patients after she went to a dentist with bad teeth. Indeed. How can that dentist take care of his patients’ teeth when he can’t take care of his own? It is also similar with doctors or parents who smoke. Can they really be authoritative or credible if they advise their patients or children to stop smoking?

 

So could chubby doctors be bad for your health? With the absence of likelihood that they could be of help to a patient’s ballooning weight, they could be. Unless if you have no issues with weight; but something just seems off about being treated or examined by an overweight physician, don’t you think?Enhanced by Zemanta